Advance Ultrasound are Your Ultrasound Specialists

Advance Ultrasound provides a comprehensive range of ultrasound imaging services.
Please click the links below to learn more.

General

Abdomen

The organs assessed are the liver, kidneys, gallbladder, pancreas, aorta, spleen, and biliary.
Ultrasound is good for evaluating conditions which change the size and shape of an organ. Solid lumps such as tumours, enlarged lymph nodes, cysts (e.g. kidney cysts, cystic tumours), and stones (e.g. gallstones, kidney stones) are normally seen well. Some inflammations, such as abscesses, and some degenerative processes, such as aortic aneurysm (ballooning of the main artery in the abdomen), can be seen.

The ultrasound scan is useful for investigating a wide range of conditions to find the cause or exclude possibilities, which helps guide your doctor.

Some reasons for an abdominal scan include abnormal blood tests, urine tests, pain or a suspected mass.

Patient Preparation

The kidneys are routinely checked as an aneurysm can sometimes result in kidney problems.

Breast

The breast, either one or both sides, and the axilla (arm pit) are scanned.

The most common reason is to check a lump. Many breast lumps can be fluid filled lumps (“cysts”) or solid nodules. It is routine for your referrer to consider further tests in addition to the ultrasound.

Another common reason for a breast scan is pain, which can be due to conditions such as cysts and infection. Breast cancer does NOT usually cause pain.

No preparation required.

Groin

The inguinal canals, vessels, lymph nodes and tendons around the groin are scanned.

The most common reason for a groin scan is pain and/or a lump.

Other conditions that can be seen include hernias, lymph nodes and tendon problems.

No preparation required.

Hernia

A hernia is a “knuckle” of tissue which bulges through a small defect and can occur in many places.

Common sites for hernias are the groin (called inguinal or femoral hernias), midline abdominal wall, such as umbilicus (umbilical hernia) and above the umbilicus (called an epigastric hernia).

Ultrasound can confirm a hernia, the size of the defect, the number of hernias, and whether the hernia contains bowel or fat. Sometimes a hernia can become ‘stuck’ which may require prompt treatment.

No preparation required.

Neck

The thyroid gland, submandibular glands and the parotid glands and lymph node areas are scanned. The scan area is from the jaw to the collar bones, and behind the ears.

Common reasons for this scan include assessment of a lump and an area of pain.

No preparation required.

General

Renal and Pelvic (female)

A scan of the kidneys, bladder and ureters (tubes between the kidney and bladder), uterus and ovaries is made from the front of the abdomen (known as a transabdominal scan). A transvaginal scan (also known as an internal scan) is often performed for a detailed assessment of the uterus, lining of the uterus (called the endometrium), ovaries and pelvic organs.
Patient Preparation

Renal Tract

Organs assessed are the kidneys, bladder and ureters (tubes between the kidney and bladder), the prostate for men.

Common reasons for assessment of the renal tract are blood in the urine, suspected kidney stones, pain, urinary tract infections (UTI’s), frequency in passing urine, assessment of residual urine after passing water and high blood pressure. A pelvis may also be requested in the male when there is pain in the lower abdomen which may not be related to the renal tract, such as appendicitis or a bowel inflammation.

Patient Preparation

Scrotum

Assessment is made of the inguinal canals leading to the scrotum and the contents of the scrotum. The testes, epididymides, cord and the scrotal sac are evaluated.

Common reasons for assessment are for pain and/or a palpable lump.

No preparation required.

Soft tissue lump

An assessment of the clinical area is made.

The lump size, location (e.g. near the skin or in muscle) and if the lump is fluid or solid can help determine what a lump is. Additional tests are commonly done to define a lump.
No preparation required.

Thyroid

The thyroid gland and nearby lymph nodes are checked.

Reasons for assessment include a lump, an enlarged thyroid, abnormal thyroid function tests and pain.

No preparation required.

Pregnancy / Obstetrics

>1st Trimester

Dating scan
This is performed in the first 12 weeks. The uterus and ovaries are assessed. In early pregnancy, an internal scan may be required.

Common reasons for this scan include uncertain dates or confirmation of dates and bleeding.

No preparation required

Nuchal scan

The nuchal scan is performed ideally at 13 weeks, with a recommendation between 11 weeks and 13 weeks and 6 days. In NZ, the National Screening Unit combines the ultrasound result with a blood test called the triple test to calculate for the risk of chromosomal abnormality, particularly trisomy 21 (Downs syndrome). A $40.00 fee applies for this scan.

No preparation required

2nd Trimester

Anatomy / Morphology scan (13-28 weeks)
This is ideally performed at 19 weeks. It primarily checks the position of the placenta and the anatomy of the baby. Many but not all structural abnormalities can be detected with this scan, which includes the brain, face, chest, heart, abdomen and limbs. The wall of the womb is checked for fibroids and the ovaries are checked for cysts. A $40.00 fee applies for this scan.

No preparation required

(29-40 weeks)

(29-40 weeks)
These scans check the baby’s growth, fluid around the baby, position of the baby and the location of the placenta. Umbilical artery doppler is often done. This is a test to check the blood flow in the umbilical cord. A Biophysical Profile (BPP) is a common scoring system used to help to assess how the pregnancy and baby are doing. A $10.00 fee applies for this scan.
No preparation required

Vascular

Carotid arteries

(Carotid duplex doppler)
The carotid arteries are the major blood vessels the head. Ultrasound is ideal for assessing these arteries using a special technique called colour doppler and duplex doppler. The degree of narrowing (often caused by plaque) can be determined by this examination.

No preparation required

DVT (Veins)

(Deep Vein Thrombosis)
A blood clot in the veins is called a thrombosis. The large deep veins in the legs are a common site for blood clots, which can cause thrombosis. A DVT ultrasound assesses the veins of the leg from the groin to the lower calf and is one of the simplest and quickest ways to check for a DVT.

No preparation required

Musculoskeletal

Lower Limb

Assessment of the lower limb generally targets one joint, muscle group or a particular area such as the Achilles tendon. Evaluation of the foot normally targets a particular area such as the heel (plantar fascia) or forefoot.

Ultrasound is good for evaluating tendon strains and tears, ligament strain and tears, muscle tears, collections of blood from injury (haematomas) and lumps. Occasionally fractures will be seen. Most are minor cracks which may not have been seen on x-ray. Ultrasound is unable to see inside bone. Structures deep to bone, such as inside the knee joint, inside the ankle joint or foot are best assessed with MRI.

No preparation required

Upper Limb

Assessment of the upper limb generally targets one joint, muscle group or a particular area such as the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand or finger.

Ultrasound is good for evaluating tendon strains and tears, ligament strain and tears, collections of blood from injury (haematomas) and lumps. Occasionally fractures will be seen. Most are minor cracks which may not have been seen on x-ray. Ultrasound is unable to see inside bone. Structures deep to bone, such as inside the shoulder joint or inside the elbow joint and wrist joint are best assessed with MRI.

No preparation required

Interventional

Cortisone injection

A needle is placed using ultrasound guidance into a specific location, with local anaesthetic and cortisone (anti-inflammatory) injected.